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Use the Color Blindness Simulator to check the accessibility of your website or design

Renée Meloche
Renée Meloche
  • Updated

Color blindness and other visual impairments like cataracts or low vision make it harder for those who experience it to distinguish between different, non-distinctive visual elements. 

Venngage makes it easy for you to create engaging, visually appealing designs that are still accessible for viewers with visual impairments, to ensure that your work will be appreciated and understood.

 

A user on Venngage's free color blind simulator page scrolls down the page, showing different headings on the page and changing the preview image with filters representing different visual impairments: regular vision, achromatopsia, deuteranopia, protanopia, tritanopia, cataracts and low vision.

Check the accessibility of your website or design

Use our visual simulator to see any website or image with a working URL the way someone with color blindness, cataracts or low vision might.

A user scrolls down Venngage's free Color Blind Simulator page. The page has the title 'Color Blind Simulator' and a subheading that reads 'Break down visual barriers with Venngage's free color blind checker.' The user scrolls past the subheading, to a section with a Venngage template in a preview pane on the left, and a list of different color blindness or visual impairment conditions. Above the preview pane, a text field for entering a website address appears; the user types 'venngage.com' in the text field. In the preview pane, the home page of Venngage.com appears; the user clicks on one of the conditions in the right bar, beside the preview pane, to change how the website appears.

Just copy-paste your design link, web or image link into the simulator URL field and use the menu in the right side bar to apply different filters representing different vision levels:

A user scrolls down Venngage's free Color Blind Simulator page. The page has the title 'Color Blind Simulator' and a subheading that reads 'Break down visual barriers with Venngage's free color blind checker.' The user scrolls past the subheading, to a section with a Venngage template in a preview pane on the left, and a list of different color blindness or visual impairment conditions; the user clicks on the conditions and the preview pane changes according to what the user clicks, changing the colors in the preview template or blurring it.

  • Regular Vision: all primary colors and their variants can be distinguished
  • Achromatopsia: Complete color blindness (everything appears in shades of grey, black and white)
  • Deuteranopia: Difficulty detecting greens (most colors appear in shade of blue, yellow or brown)
  • Protanopia: Difficulty detecting reds (most colors appear in shades of blue, yellow or brown)
  • Tritanopia: Difficulty detecting blues and yellow (most colors appear in shades of green, red or pink)
  • Cataracts: Cloudy vision that reduces contrast (makes it harder to distinguish between similar colors or shades)
  • Low Vision: Blurry and decreased vision (makes it harder to see smaller visual elements and texts, and to distinguish between similar colors or shades)

Want to run your design through a simulator before it's finalized? Use the visual simulator in our upgraded Editor

We provide a ready-made example with one of our design templates, to give you an idea of how you design will look filtered through our simulator.

A series of the same design created in the Venngage Editor; it shows a square social media graphic with an icon of a chef and informational text about a meal charity drive for kids in need. The design is filtered so that it appears as viewers with different visual impairments would see it, including several different color blindness conditions, blurry vision, cataracts, etc.

 

The feature(s) discussed in this article is available on the following Venngage subscription plans: Free, Premium, Business and Enterprise.

Curious about upgrading? Compare our plan features side by side.

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